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Posts Tagged ‘TDWI’

Again, this week I am gathering together a few reads that I have found to stick in my mind, for one reason or another.

The future of Analytics
The Data Warehouse Institute has a series of “Best Practice Reports”; a recent one is called Delivering Insights with Next-Generation Analytics.  It provides an analysis on the future of analysis, backed up with some survey results.  It characterises BI as central to analytics in a business context (and it’s hard to say what part of business analytics BI would not be involved in).  Reporting and monitoring remain crucial components of such activity, but TDWI places an emphasis on differentiating users of information and analytics, from production report consumers (wide in scope but terse in analytical focus) to the power user analysts and managers concerned with forecasting and modelling.  The essence of its recommendations are to provide appropriate tools to the differentiated users, and keep an eye on technology.  Although at a top level this isn’t exactly news, this report is packed with useful detail for those making an effort to keep on top of the intersection between business and technology.

The future of Data Warehouses
Although I had a look at some new technology in data warehousing recently, this second TWDI report (Next generation Data Warehouse Platforms) is necessarily more systematic.  It models the DW technology stack, outlines new technology and business drivers, intersperses user stories, and outlines emerging trends (eg appliances, in-memory, cloud/SaaS, columnar, open source, etc) not too different from my list.  Recommendations include: focusing on the business drivers; moving away from expensive in-house development; preparing for high-volume data; anticipating multiple path solutions, including open source.

In-memory databases
TDWI’s above report treated in-memory DWs seriously, without going into much detail on feasibility.  This is odd, given one of their recommendations involves preparing for an explosion in data to be stored.  I read a discussion on this technology (TDWI again: Q&A: In-memory Databases Promise Faster Results), which still doesn’t convince me that this isn’t a cat chasing its own tail.  The only realistic way forward I can see is by developing a dichotomy between core and peripheral data and functionality.  Haven’t seen that discussed.  Yet.

Forrester on trends and spotting them
Forrester has a new report aimed at Enterprise Architects: The Top 15 Technology Trends EA Should Watch.  These are grouped into five themes: “social computing for enterprises, process-centric information, restructured IT service platforms, Agile applications, and mobile as the new desktop”.  Some of it is discussed here, by Bill Ives.  Further, Forrester gives an outline of the criteria it uses for paying attention to a technology.  This includes how meaningful it is in the near term, its business impact, its game-changing potential, and its integrational complexity.

Vendor news: Oracle and bulk financials
Finally, news that Oracle has bought up again, this time taking over HyperRoll, whose software is geared for analysing “large amounts of financial data”.  Sounds a sensible move.

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